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3-Point Stance: Ranking Coaches All-Time at Their Schools, Teams with the Worst Offseasons, and How to Answer QB Questions

3-Point Stance - Herm Edwards

3-Point Stance - Herm Edwards

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_single_image source="featured_image" img_size="large"][vc_column_text]National Columnist Mike Farrell is here with the 3-Point Stance looking at where current coaching legends stand at their programs all time, 10 programs trending the wrong way, and the easy answer to some quarterback debates.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator][vc_column_text]— We are blessed with some current coaching legends and one or two that will become legends soon enough. But where do they stand at their programs all time (at least in the modern era)? Here’s your answer.

Nick Saban, Alabama

All-Time School Ranking: #1

Yes, we all know the legend of Bear Bryant, and what he meant to not only Alabama but the game of football. But Saban now has more career national titles (7-6), an equal number at Alabama (six each), and he's done so in a much more competitive era of college football. Saban is the greatest coach of all time, and I'm not sure you're ever going to change my mind.

Ryan Day, Ohio State

All-Time School Ranking: #4

Okay, so Day isn’t a legend despite a national title appearance and a playoff appearance but he’s on his way. Woody Hayes is obviously number one with a bullet for the Buckeyes - he won five national titles and 13 Big Ten titles in 28 seasons in Columbus. Everyone's favorite sweater vest aficionado, Jim Tressel, clocks in second after going 106-22 in 10 seasons and winning the 2002 national championship. The interesting debate comes between Day and Urban Meyer. Meyer obviously won the national title in 2013 and was wildly successful in 7 seasons, going 83-9. But the black cloud that he left over the program taints his legacy. He's still ahead of Day, but Day will jump him in the very near future, especially if the Buckeyes can win another national title.

Dabo Swinney, Clemson

All-Time School Ranking: #1

This one is very straightforward. Dabo is responsible for two of the three National Championships in Clemson history, He's only 15 wins behind Frank Howard in school history, and it's taken him half as many seasons to get there. No one in Clemson's history is in the same zip code as Swinney.

Kirby Smart, Georgia

All-Time School Ranking: #2

It's going to take a while for Kirby to jump Vince Dooley, one of the legendary coaches of all time, in terms of stature at Georgia. But the surprising thing might be just how fast he has jumped his predecessor Mark Richt. In six seasons, Smart already has more major bowl wins than Richt had in 15, a national championship (which Richt never got), and as many top-five finishes.

Jim Harbaugh, Michigan

All-Time School Ranking: #3

Despite never winning the elusive national title, Bo Schembechler remains one of the greatest coaches in history and the unquestioned number one guy in Ann Arbor (this 'modern era' caveat was made for this school - Fielding Yost would have easily been number one, but it's nearly impossible to compare football from before the turn of the 20th century to now.) Lloyd Carr's tenure was up and down, but he did win that 1997 National Championship. Time will now tell if Harbaugh is able to build on last season's success.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator][vc_column_text]— Last week I did the overall top 10 for stock up since last season based on how recruiting is going (high school and the portal) as well as whispers out of spring football. But how about down? Here’s a difficult list to put together.

Arizona State

There is so much tumult around this program at the moment. Herm Edwards may have had it all moving in the right direction early in his tenure, but the wheels have started to fall off over the past two seasons. It began with the transfer of Jayden Daniels to LSU but even better players have now left. It's hard to imagine him lasting past the season.

Auburn

This team is simply in a free fall. It's a small miracle that Bryan Harsin wasn't fired already given the state of the program and how badly the boosters wanted him gone. There’s no way to sugarcoat this as they are picked by most to finish last in the SEC West and some of the coaching hires are just odd.

Indiana

Coming off of one of their best seasons in program history in 2020, last season was supposed to be the year where the Hoosiers finally broke through and won double-digit games for the first time in their history. Fast forward one year, and they're bereft of talent on the offensive side of the ball, lost 2020 breakout quarterback Michael Penix Jr. to Washington in the transfer portal, and haven't added anyone outside of Connor Bazelak in return.

Oklahoma

It's hard to lose so much talent from the roster and be on the upswing. Yes, Brent Venables has done yeoman's work since he took over, but considering just how many guys they lost to the portal including two elite quarterbacks, there's still a long way to go.

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Louisville

The loss of Tyler Harrell to Alabama really stings for this team, as he was expected to not only be Malik Cunningham's number one target, but his ability to get open downfield allows their outstanding tight end, Marshon Ford, to get one-on-one matchups in coverage that he can exploit. A really tough blow for the Cardinals and the portal hasn’t been kind despite a couple of recent additions.

Vanderbilt

My goal with this is not to kick teams while they're down. But Vanderbilt is simply so bad at every position at the moment. Second-year coach Clark Lea still can't decide who he wants to play quarterback for him, and they lost their best offensive lineman (Tyler Steen) to Alabama. It's going to be yet another long season for the 'Dores.

TCU

Like I've said multiple times in this column before, I just don't quite see it with Sonny Dykes. And it doesn't help that Zach Evans is now lining up in the backfield for Ole Miss. It is going to be a long season for the Horned Frogs.

Georgia Tech

Like TCU, Georgia Tech lost their best offensive weapon (Jahmyr Gibbs) to an SEC West team that was in need of an upgrade at the position. This program just feels rudderless at this point - Geoff Collins has yet to establish any sort of clear identity for this team since he took over before the 2019 season.

Missouri

I'm still a bit shocked that Connor Bazelak decided to transfer to Indiana considering the state of their program. But that's an indicator of where things are right now with the Mizzou program. They also lost their best defensive player in Mekhi Wingo to LSU, and really don't have a ton in the pipeline ready to replace his presence in the middle of that defense.

Minnesota

The Gophers have lost a ton of talent this offseason simply because they have too many quality running backs. So while that's definitely not the worst problem to have in a vacuum, in this case it's led to two of them transferring out and one of the ones remaining coming off of a very serious knee injury. And Tanner Morgan is back for a fifth year, which would be great, if he hadn't gotten statistically worse every year as a starter.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator][vc_column_text]— And finally, I have the answer for coaches still trying to decide on who starts at quarterback. And it’s not that hard.

Clemson

Start Cade Klubnick. We’ve seen the regression of DJ Uiagalelei and he was given chance after chance last season and never improved. His confidence is shot so roll with the flashy freshman.

Notre Dame

Tyler Buchner is the answer. He brings more to the table than Drew Pyne as far as the ability to make good decisions and see the field.

LSU

Go with Jayden Daniels and see what happens. Myles Brennan would get hurt anyhow.

Michigan

Cade McNamara has a year under his belt and a spring while JJ McCarthy is just too inexperienced for Jim Harbaugh. And we all know this.

Oregon

Let Ty Thompson run the program or you will lose him. We’ve all see what Bo Nix can do and it’s limited.

Texas A&M

Max Johnson is the guy. He showed me a lot last season and I’ve always felt Haynes King was a bit overrated. Connor Weigman could be the future but he’s probably not there just yet.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]